T-Pain Should Perform Live More Often

Tiny Desk Concert for NPR Music Strips Pop Singer of Signature Auto-Tune

T-Pain had it in him all along: He can sing without auto-tune. The singer and songwriter recently performed a cappella versions of three of his songs for NPR Music’s Tiny Desk Concert and it was nothing short of amazing.

Some artists are known for their live performances, for example Pink, others are known for using Auto-Tune, that’s T-Pain.

T-Pain didn’t use the tool during his performance and he sounded great. Along with a pianist, Toro, the singer sang “Buy U A Drank (Shawty Snappin’),” “Up Down (Do This All Day)” and “Drankin’ Patna.”

During the session, the singer joked, “I know everybody is wondering where the Auto-Tune is gonna come from. It’s okay. I got it in my pocket. Totally fine. I got right here. It’s surgically inserted.”

For over a decade, the singer has been known for making fun, light songs about having sex with women and drinking alcohol, but he is also known for a little tool he uses on his songs. He utilizes (and made famous) Auto-Tune.

Auto-Tune is an audio processor that uses a device to measure and modify pitch levels in vocal and instrumental music recordings.

Sadly, this process of artistic music creation has hindered the most important piece of his career: T-Pain can sing.

The two-time Grammy Award winning singer and songwriter is releasing a greatest hits album, “T-Pain Presents Happy Hour: The Greatest Hits,” which is out on November 4.

T-Pain should sing live more often. Watch the mini concert below and enjoy the show.

ADVISORY: This video contains explicit language.


www.npr.org


Montclair State | New Jersey
11.06.2014

Katherine Aucena

Katherine Aucena is a Journalist, Web Developer and a Professional Chef. She obtained a bachelor of arts in Journalism from Montclair State University.

Aucena fulfilled her passion of cooking by completing the culinary arts program at The French Culinar Institute in 2011. She graduated high school with a 2-year technical degree in Computer Science and received her associates of arts in Communications Media Arts. She has worked on various TV shows, radio, as a contributing writer and in the food industry. She currently works in the magazine publishing industry.